Pre-Planning / Planning Ahead

“Is this what they would have wanted?” is an all too common question when families come to plan a funeral. Making your wishes clear ahead of time can prove to be a great comfort to loved ones.

What Is Pre-Planning?

Pre-planning is simply the process of drawing up plans for a funeral before they are needed. It involves gathering a variety of family information and making decisions about the type of service you want (e.g. where the funeral itself should take place and who might participate). Working together with a funeral director or preplanning counselor, you can plan, organize and record all of your requests.

Our staff can lead you through the process, providing advice and guidance along the way. They will ensure that you have all the information you need about our products and services, allowing you to make informed decisions.

You may choose to pay for the arrangements in advance, or your plans can simply be held on file at the funeral home to be carried out when they are needed and invoiced to the family at that time. Our staff will explain your options when you meet them.

Why Pre-Plan?

While everyone who makes the decision to pre-plan has their own reasons for doing so, we are often told the greatest motivator is the desire to protect their family by ensuring that they won’t face the difficult task of making arrangements at a time of loss.

We advocate pre-planning because our experience has shown us that not only is planning ahead virtually stress-free, but people have the time and information they need to make carefully considered, pressure-free decisions that are the right choices for themselves and their families.

Practical Information For Your Family

In addition to pre-planning your funeral, completing a Personal Information Form and giving a copy to your personal representative, spouse and children will give you peace of mind knowing that they will have all the information they need to properly handle your wishes and the details of your estate.

TIP: Don’t put this form in your safety deposit box as these are often difficult to access immediately following a death.